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Gay Egypt: President Al-Sisi is Worse For Gays Than Muslim Brotherhood

| August 3rd, 2014 | Comments Off

Daily Beast looks into the LGBT community since Egypt has been headed by its third president in three years, Abdel-Fattah Sisi’. His election did not bode well for Egypt’s already nervous gay citizens who suffered under previous anti-gay leaders. Sisi was Commander-in-Chief of the Egyptian Armed Forces, as well as Minister of Defence so it’s no surprise to anyone that he has cracked down on dissidents, the press and the LGBT community.   Also see: Egypt Photo Galleries Gay Egypt News & Reports   June 28, 2014 The Daily Beast Cairo, Egypt The party at a villa in a western suburb of Cairo was in full swing when three armored police trucks quietly pulled up to the main gate. More than 300 men and women from the gay community had gathered in Kerdassa on the same day, November 4, that former President Mohamed Morsi of the puritanical Muslim Brotherhood first

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Gay Uganda: A Dangerous Place

| January 23rd, 2014 | Comments Off

Dangerous liaisons: Meeting up with Uganda LGBT activists Sam Ganafa and Long Jones By JP Conly, RN January 23rd, 2014 Originally published i the San diego Gay and Lesbian News Before traveling to Uganda I heard about the shocking arrest of Sam Ganafa, an LGBT activist who is executive director of Spectrum Uganda Initiative and chairman of the Sexual Minorities of Uganda (SMUG). Sam was someone I had been planning on connecting with to learn more about the plight of LGBT people in Uganda as well as learn about how HIV and AIDS is treated in the landlocked nation in East Africa. Several of my hospital co-workers, after hearing about Sam’s arrest, asked me not to travel to Uganda, because it is one of the most dangerous places in Africa for someone such as myself to travel. I had already made up my mind that the only way I would

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Uganda : Homophobic Law Passed

| December 27th, 2013 | Comments Off

How things quickly turned wrong in Uganda JP Conly December 27th, 2013 Originally published in the San Diego Gay and Lesbian News Since JP Conly returned home the Uganda Parliament voted, on 20 December 2013, to approve the Anti-Homosexuality Bill that creates harsh prison sentences for anyone convicted of being a “repeat offender” and sends people to jail for not reporting LGBT Ugandans to authorities. The shocking developments, conducted in secret without public notification and amid accusations that Parliament acted without a proper quorum, has shaken Conly to his very core, especially after he witnessed positive changes during his visit to Kampala. The title of my first story was written under the term “grateful” because gratitude is an essential part of my life . When I went to a Uganda, I went with optimistic eyes, which at times can be difficult when trying to share their experience through my eyes.

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Uganda: Grateful to Volunteer

| December 6th, 2013 | Comments Off

Grateful to volunteer in Uganda By JP Conly, RN December 12th, 2013 This is the first of three reports originally published in the San Diego Gay and Lesbian News. (JP Conly, a nurse from San Diego, found clinic conditions to be minimal in Uganda and their need for our help) As a nurse and a man who has been a part of the LGBT community since I was 21, I was deeply moved and inspired to get involved with the activities of St. Paul’s Foundation for International Reconciliation (San Diego) and their work in Uganda. I was also motivated after meeting Bishop Christopher Senyonja (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Senyonjo) in San Diego three years ago while he was touring the United States and fundraising for St. Paul’s Center in Kampala. After hearing Bishop Christopher and his story about how the marginalized and the LGBT community were being persecuted, I felt driven to help in

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Evolution of Kenya LGBT Rights and Spaces Since 2008.

| February 18th, 2013 | Comments Off

By David Kuria Founding Director, Gay and Lesbian Coalition Kenya (GALCK) August 2012 Here is update on the LGBT situation in Kenya for our LGBT community in recent years. I have focused on the broader picture of the movement and the social scene. Having been involved as the first director, of Galck, it is likely that I have presented a much more rosy picture than may be the actual case, though I tried to be as objective as possible. Introduction The Gay and Lesbian Coalition (GALCK) in their website (www.galck.org) say LGBT spaces and groups have expanded exponentially since 2008. GALCK is an umbrella organization bringing together a membership of six organizations including, ISHTAR MSM, Gay Kenya, Minority Women in Action, Transgender Education and Advocacy, Afra Kenya and PEMA Kenya. The latter is based in Mombasa – the Kenyan coastal town. Thus of the original nine members only three remain

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Gay Life in Angola

| January 13th, 2013 | Comments Off

Compiled by Richard Ammon GlobalGayz.com February 2012 Introduction A rare glimpse into gay life in Angola where the social environment is toxic for LGBT  people. Because they are an invisible population, gays are ignored in government health planning, “there are not enough gays to worry about” said one official. To cover their truth, many Angolan gays use marriage as a way of avoiding harm, but once married, continue to have occasional sex with other men. In many cases, the casual sex does not involve the use of condoms. In Angola, a commonly-held assumption that only men with feminine mannerisms are homosexual means that many who have sex with other men do not self-identify as gay.   PlusNews http://www.plusnews.org/Report.aspx?ReportId=78814 19 June 2008 Invisible and vulnerable Luanda – It was a wedding that pulled out all the stops, including a party at the Marine Club on the island of Luanda and a

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Being Gay in Algeria Today

| January 13th, 2013 | Comments Off

Intro: Living their sexuality mostly in hiding, the gays of Algeria are cautiously more evident, but face a reactionary social mentality. The penal code severely condemns homosexuality so gays are faced with major difficulties for meeting or socializing. The Internet is helpful but finding privacy is a problem.   Source: Gay Maroc By Slimane September 13, 2010 [translation by F. Young] Algiers With its suburbs, its minarets and its streets where pedestrians stroll by, an air of tranquility lives in this city bathed by the sea and the sun. It is 10 a.m. Salim, 25, a hairdresser who looks like a model, leaves his home on foot to go to work. A resident of the popular Badjarah neighbourhood East of Algiers, he is one of the gays that live in hiding. Although he smiles for his customers, he doesn’t hide his despair. “I wonder why I’m not like the others,”

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Tunisia, La Marsa & Gammarth Towns

| January 1st, 2013 | Comments Off

La Marsa is an upscale suburban town north of the capital of Tunis, located on the Mediterranean Sea. It is a pleasant beach town and popular in the summer with many restaurants and a few hotels. It is also home to numerous affluent Tunisians and expats who enjoy the ambiance. I rented an apartment here during my visit and took the local TGM tram into Tunis each day; on the way the tram goes through the ancient town of Carthage. The next town north of La Marsa is a wealthy place called Gammarth, famous for the five-star hotels, fine beaches, the French war cemetery as well as destroyed mansions of the former corrupt president Ben Ali.   Posted Gabes, Tunisia.

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Tunisia, Sidi Bou Said Town

| December 31st, 2012 | Comments Off

Sidi Bou Said is a small suburban town near Tunis. The town itself is an attractive tourist location known for the extensive use of blue and white colors on buildings. Here is located the former palace of Rodolfe d’Erlanger, a wealthy French banker who built his manse overlooking the sea between 1909 and 1921. He named it Ennejma Ezzahra (sometimes spelled Nejma Ezzohara). The grand structure now houses the Centre des Musiques Arabes et Méditerranéennes, a music school. He helped to revive the musical genre known as ‘ma’luf’ during the 1920s. He transposed the Arabic musical scale to that of Western music, maintaining his own orchestra of Arab musicians to do so. He is also known for his six-volume work about the history of Arabic music. Rodolfe was an accomplished painter whose art works hang throughout the palace and in numerous museums. He lived from 1872 to 1932 and died

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Tunisia, Tunis World War II Cemeteries

| December 31st, 2012 | Comments Off

There are two war cemeteries in the Tunis area where the World War II dead are buried. One is American, in Carthage, and the other is French, in Gammarth. The Battle of Tunisia occurred from 17 November 1942 to 13 May 1943. Also called the Tunisia Campaign, it was a series of battles that took place in Tunisia during the North African Campaign of the Second World War, between Axis and Allied forces. The Allies consisted of British Imperial Forces, including Polish and Greek contingents, with American and French corps. British and Commonwealth losses amounted to 38,360 men; 6,233 killed, 21,528 wounded, and 10,599 missing. Free French losses accumulated to 19,439 men; 2,156 killed, 10,276 wounded, and 7,007 missing. American losses amounted to 18,221 men; 2,715 killed, 8,978 wounded, and 6,528 missing. Over 230,000 German and Italian troops were taken as prisoners of war, including most of the Afrika Korps.

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Tunisia, Carthage Ruins

| December 30th, 2012 | Comments Off

Modern Carthage is an upscale suburb of Tunis, Tunisia, with a population of about 22,000. Ancient Carthage is believed to have been founded in the 8th century BC then destroyed by warfare with Rome in the 3rd Puni war (149 BC to 146 BC). It was rebuilt by Rome in the 1st century BC to the 1st century AD to become one of the great cities of the empire. After the fall of the Romans the Byzantines and Vandals ruled the city, eventually followed by the Arabs. The city has existed for nearly 3,000 years. The former magnificence of the city is hard to overstate.   Posted Gabes, Tunisia.

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Tunisia, Tunis Medina

| December 29th, 2012 | Comments Off

The medina (souq) marketplace is the ancient core of Tunis, since the 7th century. Narrow alleyways are lined with hundreds of tiny shops and stalls selling everything from ladies underwear to sweet pastries. Every corner is a different scene, from pizza bakeries to cafes with hookah pipes for rent. Its crowded, colorful and noisy. The main mosque is Zaytouna that dates from the 8th century. Some of the mosque’s columns were taken from the ruins of nearby Carthage, not an easy task since a single column weighs several tons. During the French occupation of Tunisia in the 19-20th centuries the city grew far beyond the medina and is now a modern city of 2.5 million people.   Posted Gabes, Tunisia.

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Tunisia, Bardo Museum

| December 28th, 2012 | Comments Off

The Bardo Museum in the capital city of Tunis contains the world’s largest collection of Roman mosaics as well as hundreds of Roman and Greek eras bronze and marble statuary. It was recently enlarged and renovated to better display the thousands of artifacts of Tunisia’s ancient history.    Posted Gabes, Tunisia.

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Gay Life in Tunisia

| December 26th, 2012 | Comments Off

Introduction There are countless reports from many Arab/Muslim societies about persecution, harassment or imprisonment of gay citizens, from Egypt to Iraq, Iran and Saudi Arabia where intolerance is the common rule. But Tunisia has a history of moderation and balance between Western and Muslim ideas and lifestyles. Indeed, I saw many Mercedes and BMWs and upscale Euro-style clothing and homes in Tunis. Ironically much of this happened under the 24-year governance of a corrupt and dictatorial president who was driven from office in early 2011 that started the infamous ‘Arab Spring.’ For this story I did not meet LGBT people who were living in fear or shame. This is not to suggest LGBT Tunisians are out and free. Most are not and they live within the confines and closets imposed by conservative Muslim dictates of modesty and discretion. The people I interviewed were fortunate not to be fearful in their

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For Gays and Lesbians Apartheid is Alive and Well

| October 28th, 2012 | Comments Off

Last night on PBS a drama titled ‘Endgame’ was broadcast nationwide that focused on the intense and delicate negotiations in South Africa in the late 1980’s that brought down apartheid and brought a new dawn of democracy in that tormented country. It was a gripping drama of real life brought close up with cameras, script and fine acting by players who had not previously been privy to the dangers and risks of the political and murderous chess match. At any one time, any one of the historical figures could have been assassinated, including Nelson Mandela whose release from 27 years in prison was the keystone to the new order of life in South Africa. I couldn’t help thinking of the poignant parallel between the South African apartheid mentality that justified so much killing and violence, and the ongoing apartheid of today that continues against homo-affectional citizens around the world that

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Gay in Zambia

| September 22nd, 2012 | Comments Off

By Linda_Villarosa September 22, 2012 Huffington Post Those of us who are black and gay approach Africa with deeply conflicted feelings. On a recent trip to Zambia, along with my point-and-shoot and anti-malaria medication, I packed equal parts pride and shame, curiosity and fear. Homosexuality is illegal in nearly 40 African countries, and in the harshest nations — including Sudan and parts of Nigeria — it remains punishable by death. Violence against LGBT people is common, including government-sanctioned beating, stoning and whipping. And in South Africa, the most progressive nation of the continent, lesbians are frequently the victims of brutal corrective rape, intended to “cure” them of their sexual feelings toward other women. Zambia, while not as transgressive or dangerous as other African countries, remains problematic. Being gay isn’t illegal, but homosexual acts between men are outlawed under the Zambian constitution. The day I arrived, a headline in the Zambia

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Gay Kenya Continues Out and Proud in 2012

| September 5th, 2012 | Comments Off

Homosexuality in Kenya continues to be a controversial issue, but gay rights advocates continue their advocacy for equality and tolerance. The most vigorous organization is Gays and Lesbians Coalition of Kenya (GALCK) founded in 2004 which leads the struggle for gay Kenyans everywhere.   Evolution of LGBT Rights and Spaces since 2008 This report was composed by David Kuria (photo right), former longtime director of GALCK. Last year he resigned from that position to run for public office in the Kenyan senate. His first bid was unsuccessful, not surprising since he was the first openly gay person ever to run for parliament in Kenya. He is currently campaigning for office once again, hoping for victory in the March 2013 election. (Financial donations for his campaign are welcome.) The Gay and Lesbian Coalition – GALCK – in their website  say LGBT spaces and groups have expanded exponentially since 2008.   GALCK

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Gay Cruise Ship Forbidden Morocco Landing

| July 2nd, 2012 | Comments Off

This is an outrageous and offensive event: Gay Cruise Ship Forbidden Morocco Landing This is clearly homophobia whipped up by local media hysteria, despite no official government ban. “Morocco’s Tourism Minister Lahcen Haddad said no official decision had been made to prevent the ship from stopping in Morocco.” Too bad  the ship captain didn’t take a passenger vote on this. A landing could have caused a stir in port that might have awakened Morocco to its discriminatory policies–and awakened Holland American Cruise Lines to it’s inadvertent support of anti-gay governments. Refusing to land cruise ships in homophobic countries (especially in Africa and Caribbean) can mean the loss of big tourist dollars and force these regimes to reconsider their irrational and anti-human rights policies. Being gay IS, unfortunately,  political and we all need to push for equality, even when on holiday. We are always human and always feel the pain of

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Gay Uganda: Interviews with Activists

| June 1st, 2012 | Comments Off
david-kato

Introduction The country may be homophobic and the politicians and clerics may be close-minded but that does not stop Uganda’s LGBT activists from charging on with hope and integrity. In Memorium: On February 26, 2011 one of Uganda’s finest and most outspoken LGBT rights activist, David Kato, was murdered in cold blood in his home. Friends and activists called him the “grandfather of the kuchus”, a self-applied label by Ugandan LGBTs. GlobalGayz was privileged to interview him for this story in 2008. He was a brave and highly committed activist who pushed the struggle for gay rights since the 1990′s. Over the years he was jailed for his advocacy work and he was not afraid to go to public court to stop a Kampala tabloid from falsely outing suspected gays. He won. This story is dedicated to the memory of that braveheart, David Kato. See the new documentary ‘Call Me Kuchi’ about David

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Gay Uganda: a Bigot’s View

| April 1st, 2012 | Comments Off

A biased news article composed by an ill-informed reporter about gays in the capital city Kampala. It is poorly focused, punctuated with useless hearsay including quotes from ‘professionals’ with outdated and irrelevant ideas about the ’cause’ of homosexuality. It’s a daunting–and typical–introduction to Ugandan public attitudes toward lesbigay citizens in that country. Also see: Gay Uganda Stories Gay Uganda News & Reports 2002 to present Gay Uganda Photo Galleries New Vision (http://www.newvision.co.ug) From http://allafrica.com/stories/200208300163.html Originally published August 30, 2002 Updated 2012 Kampala, Uganda Counselors Disregard Inborn Homosexuality By Denis Jjuuko About four weeks ago, my editor assigned me to do an interview with a homosexual. I visited some NGOs and inquired if they had any of their contacts, but all in vain. I contacted a few female friends, but they too were not helpful. Eventually, I was directed to a popular restaurant in town. This restaurant is run by a

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Gay Life in Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic

| March 1st, 2012 | Comments Off

Compiled by Richard Ammon GlobalGayz.com March 2012 Introduction The Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic (SADR) is a partially recognised state that claims sovereignty over the entire territory of Western Sahara, a former Spanish colony. On Feb. 27, 1976, the Polisario Front formally proclaimed the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic and set up a government in exile, initiating a guerrilla war between the Polisario and Morocco, which continued until a 1991 cease-fire. As part of the peace accords, a referendum was to be held among indigenous people, giving them the option between independence or inclusion to Morocco. However, to date the referendum has not been held because of questions over who is eligible to vote. LGBT People in the SADR There is virtually nothing to be found on the internet about LGBT people of Western Sahara. But given the fact that Muslims make up nearly 100% of the population of the area  the

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Gay Life in Cape Verde

| February 29th, 2012 | Comments Off

Compiled by Richard Ammon GlobalGayz.com March 2012   Introduction Posted here are some stories and reports about LGBT life in Cape Verde. There is little internet insight into the actual lives of gay Verdean other than the one essay by Ivalindo, native of Cape Verde (see #4) some indirect references. Being Africa there is the usual homophobia in society, yet also being Portuguese and European there seems to be less intensity to discrimination.   (1) Country Description The Republic of Cape Verde is an island country, spanning an archipelago of 10 islands located in the central Atlantic Ocean, 570 ams off the coast of Northwestern Africa. The previously uninhabited islands were discovered and colonized by the Portuguese in the 15th Century, and became important in the Atlantic slave trade for their location. The islands’ prosperity often attracted privateers and pirates, including Sir Francis Drake, a corsair (privateer) under the authority

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Gay Life in São Tomé and Príncipe

| February 28th, 2012 | Comments Off

  Compiled by Richard Ammon GlobalGayz.com February 2012 Introduction Not surprising there is virtually no recent insight about LGBT life on this small two island nation. There is one short story, posted below, about a gay man in 2003 whose experience and attitude were expressed thus:  “Several people here know I’m gay, and it has NO bearing on my daily life. The overall philosophy being ‘Live and let live’, no one seems to care. I was approached once by a local and that relationship lasted a while. People knew – or at least suspected – what was going on, and it affected no one’s life, in or outside the bedroom.” That was in 2003. Since then homophobia has spread across Africa like a plague and countless LGBT people have been killed or persecuted. On the mainland homophobic legislators are trying to outdo one another with proposed anti-gay statutes, especially since

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Gay Life in Lesotho

| February 27th, 2012 | Comments Off

Compiled by Richard Ammon GlobalGayz.com February 2012   Introduction Male same-sex sexual acts are illegal in Lesotho—a sharp contrast to South Africa, which completely surrounds the country. Lesotho law does not address sexual orientation.  LGBT people face discrimination in employment, housing, access to health care, access to education, or other areas. Homosexual conduct is taboo in the society, and is not openly discussed. But that is now being challenged. Following here are five reports that offer some insight into LGBT life in Lesotho.   (1) First, some Good News About Gay Life in Lesotho: LGBTI Support Group Registered in Lesotho By Fiona Coyle, HIV & AIDS Officer, UNDP In what has been described by activists as a significant milestone for the Lesotho Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, transgender and Inter-gender (LGBTI) communities, November 2010 saw the registration of MATRIX support group as a Non-Profit Organisation by the Lesotho Law Office. Men who

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Gay Life in Swaziland

| February 27th, 2012 | Comments Off

Compiled by Richard Ammon GlobalGayz.com February 2012 Introduction Off to a bad start: “Very little information is available on same-sex couples in Swaziland and no gay organizations are involved in the government anti-HIV campaign. The Gays and Lesbians Association of Swaziland (GALESWA), formed in the 1990s, has only one known member. The constitution does not safeguard the rights of homosexuals, and sodomy laws dating from the early 20th century are still on the books. King Mswati has reportedly called same-sex relationships “satanic”, and Prime Minister Barnabas Dlamini has called homosexuality “an abnormality and a sickness.” (Read full story at Behind the Mask) Corrupt Monarchy Swaziland is an absolute monarchy, and the morally corrupt King Mswati III (with 13 wives and numerous opulent palaces in his impoverished country) has ultimate authority over the cabinet, legislature, and judiciary. According to the 2007 census, the population was 1.02 million. There is a prime

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