Gay Life in U.S. Virgin Islands

The British Virgin Islands and the US Virgin Islands are among the more gay welcoming islands in the Caribbean, but are not without resistance and secret lives. For the most part they lack the conflict and drama found on other islands which discriminate or criminalize same-sex activity. Throughout most Caribbean islands, even though homosexuality is legal, there are varying degrees of native Afro-Caribbean homophobia which can make life uncomfortable for gay citizens and tourists. However, most of it is silent and invisible and most tourists will hardly notice.

Gay Life in Dominica

Gay Life in Dominica is similar to other gay-unfriendly island-nations in the Caribbean. It is both known and unknown, visible only to those who want to know and invisible to those who reject it as anything acceptable. It is a cat-and mouse game of pretending to be normal in a heterosexual culture (many gays marry

Gay Life in Saint Kitts & Nevis

Homosexuality in Saint Kitts and Nevis is like homophobia—hidden and disguised behind smiles, dollars, pretty beaches and friendly hotels and restaurants. But the shadow side of gay life in Saint Kitts & Nevis is not so pretty or nice.   Double Standard Not unusual for a homophobic nation dependent on tourist dollars, Saint Kitts and

Gay Life in Barbados

Barbados is one of many small Caribbean countries where homosexuality is illegal but is mostly ignored since so few people are ‘out’ in public. It is ignored and also ill-informed with anti-gay opinions running high, if one is asked. Mostly the topic is kept in silence as is the personal life of LGBT citizens.

Gay Dominican Republic: New Surprises and Old Fears

Introduction: Only a couple of days in Santo Domingo, the capital of the Dominican Republic and the oldest city in the Americas, are needed to see the lively gay venues and the lesbigay spirit that is here. The trendy music places that beat late into the night are, however, only the louder tip of a more subdued community of health educators, closeted intellectuals and quiet gay businessmen who all live in a conservative political milieu that inhibits most LGBT people from being more active as advocates. And it doesn’t help that the local Catholic Cardinal has some oppressively medieval ideas about gays. But there is vital gay energy here despite the opposition and LGBT organizations continue to form.

Gay Jamaica: Crime and Punishment

Intro: The news from Jamaica is not good. It is one of the least gay-friendly countries in the  western hemisphere. Laws against homosexuality are actively enforced bringing the wrath of the conservative government and street gangs on offenders. Attacks are not uncommon against gays or people suspected of being gay. In the Jamaica News and

Farewell to Gay Sydney–For Now

Sydney, Australia Richard Ammon, GlobalGayz November 21, 2009 Saying good-by to this remarkably intelligent city is tinged with sadness for me. For a gay person to live or visit, it doesn’t get much better than here. The LGBT community is vitally alive in virtually every fabric of daily life, from the highest reaches of government

Jamaica – Noel Coward’s House

Noel Coward, the multi-talented British playwright, actor, songwriter raconteur, first visited Jamaica in 1944 on a two week holiday. The and peace of mind he found in Jamaica caused him to refer to it as his "dream island" and he vowed to return one day. Four years later he rented fellow author Ian Fleming’s estate,

Jamaica – North Coast

Jamaica is formerly a Spanish possession known as Santiago, it later became the British West Indies Crown colony of Jamaica. It is the third most populous English-speaking country in the Americas, after the United States and Canada. Jamaica slowly gained independence from the United Kingdom and in 1958. Jamaica’s prosperity has dimished since the 1980s

Jamaica – Montego Bay

Jamaica is formerly a Spanish possession known as Santiago, it later became the British West Indies Crown colony of Jamaica. It is the third most populous English-speaking country in the Americas, after the United States and Canada. Jamaica slowly gained independence from the United Kingdom and in 1958. Jamaica’s prosperity has diminished since the 1980s

Cuba – Havana: City (1)

Cuba was in Spanish possession for almost 400 years (circa 1511-1898). Its economy was based on plantation agriculture, mining and the export of sugar, coffee and tobacco to Europe and later to North America. The political and military history of Cuba in the 19th and 20th centuries has been tumultuous. On December 2, 1956 a

Cuba – Havana: City (2)

Cuba was in Spanish possession for almost 400 years (circa 1511-1898). Its economy was based on plantation agriculture, mining and the export of sugar, coffee and tobacco to Europe and later to North America. The political and military history of Cuba in the 19th and 20th centuries has been tumultuous. On December 2, 1956 a

Dominican Republic – Santo Domingo (1)

The Dominican Republic is the site of the first permanent European settlement in the Americas; its capital Santo Domingo was also the first colonial capital in the Americas. It is the site of the first cathedral, university, European-built road, European-built fortress, and more. For most of its independent history, the nation experienced political turmoil and

Gay Haiti

Intro: Probably the most immediate and visual source of knowledge about the LGBT life in Haiti is the 2001 film ‘Of Men and Gods’ which documents the discreet world of gays and transvestites in this country where homosexuality is legal but not tolerated by the mostly Christian culture. Eighty percent of the country is Catholic and another fifteen percent are Protestant; needless to say, the Biblical curse is heavily upon gays here. Yet more than half the population also indulge in voodoo beliefs and rituals where it’s the spirit that matters, not the gender or orientation.

During the reign of the Duvalier dictators (1957-86), as well as today, Haitian gay citizens are forced to walk a shadowy line between revealing themselves to a select few friends and living discreetly in the larger disapproving heterosexual society.

Posted here are four stories about life in Haiti from different perspectives: (1) my own story based on a visit to Haiti , (2) a gay Haitian-American man’s testimony, (3) a commentary about gays and voudou, and (4) an article about Haiti’s economic conditions.

The Taxis in Haiti’s Port au Prince

By Richard Ammon March 2003 Updated July 2006 Also see: Gay Haiti Stories Gay Haiti News & Reports 2002 to present  Gay Haiti Photo Galleries A couple of years ago I took several taxi rides in various Japanese cities. The cars were newer models–virtually all white Toyotas–spotless inside and out; the seat backs had doilies

Haiti – Port au Prince

Haiti occupies the island of Hispaniola, along with the Dominican Republic, in the Caribbean The total area of Haiti is 27,750 square kilometres (10,714 sq mi) and its capital is Port-au-Prince. Haiti’s regional, historical, and ethnolinguistic position is unique for several reasons. It was the first post-colonial independent black-led nation in the world, as well

Haiti – Jacmel & Port-au-Prince

Haiti occupies the island of Hispaniola, along with the Dominican Republic, in the Caribbean The total area of Haiti is 27,750 square kilometres (10,714 sq mi) and its capital is Port-au-Prince. Jacmel is a serene port town with an estimated population of 40,000 and growing. The city has not changed much since the late 19th