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Gay India–Part 4: Bangalore

A Four-part Journey Through South India in Search of LGBT life Also see: Islam and Homosexuality Gay India Stories Gay India News & Reports 2000 to present Gay India Photo Galleries Read this historic story first Bangalore Bangalore is another of India’s forward-leaning mega-cities. In the center of the country and at an altitude of

Gay India–Part 1 (Intro): Bombay/Mumbai

A Four-part Journey Through South India in Search of LGBT Life Also see: Islam and Homosexuality Gay India Stories Gay India News & Reports 2000 to present Gay India Photo Galleries Introduction Read this historic story first The sheer size of India makes ‘a’ Gay India story an impossible task, and it’s not just size

Gay India–Part 2: Hyderabad

A Four-part Journey Through South India in Search of LGBT Life Also see: Islam and Homosexuality Gay India Stories Gay India News & Reports 2000 to present Gay India Photo Galleries Read this historic story first Hyderabad Hyderabad is the capital city of the state of Andhar Pradesh in central India. Over the past decade

Gay India–Part 3: Chennai /Madras

A Four-part Journey Through South India in Search of LGBT life Also see: Islam and Homosexuality Gay India Stories Gay India News & Reports 2000 to present Gay India Photo Galleries Read this historic story first Chennai (Madras) Sahodaran and SAATHII It’s no easier to find a publicly visible gay community in Chennai than Hyderabad

Gay India 2001-03: Many Faces, Secret Traditions and Bold New Times

Intro: Two academic commentaries and three interviews serve as a basic introduction to the vast and complex potpourri of cultures known as India. Gay India is one of the convoluted subcultures folded
into the intense tapestry of languages, customs, religions and secular traditions in this country of a billion people.

In parts one and two, guest authors discuss widespread male-male sexuality as an unspoken and unquestioned–and unlabeled–way of life integrated into family and village customs. The public–spoken or written–label of ‘gay’ or ‘homosexual’ is questioned as a valid description of such men: traditional MSM does not necessarily mean today’s ‘queer’.

Following these academic commentaries are links to parts three and four: interviews with three important gay and lesbian leaders who give a more ‘flesh and blood’ feel for gay life that is ‘out’ and evident in modern India.

The final fifth section is a story about Calcutta’s first gay pride parade and a reflection of its extended meaning.