Tasmania West and Central

Central and western Tasmani is mostly wilderness. The main city is Queenstown which is in the center of a large mining area. Great swaths of forest were mowed down for fuel for the mineral smelters (mostly copper) leaving the land looking like a moonscape. But most of western Tasmania is quite beautiful with coastlines, forests, villages, lakes and…wilderness.

 

The western half of Tasmania is lightly settled and remains
The western half of Tasmania is lightly settled and remains much in wilderness.
Central and western Tasmani is mostly wilderness. The main city
Central and western Tasmani is mostly wilderness. The main city is Queenstown which is in the center of a large mining area. Great swaths of forest have been mowed down to get a the minerals underground leaving the land looking like a moonscape. But most of westernTasmania is quite beautiful with coastlines, forests, villages, lakes and...wilderness.
Yolla town topiary skills gone awry!
Yolla town topiary skills gone awry!
Old mining shaft
Old mining shaft
Old mining town museum
Old mining town museum
Old mining town cable cars for ore
Old mining town cable cars for ore
Road sign in Western Tasmania
Road sign in Western Tasmania
Zeehan town
Zeehan town
Zeehan town West Coast Pioneers Museum
Zeehan town West Coast Pioneers Museum
Zeehan town West Coast Pioneers Museum
Zeehan town West Coast Pioneers Museum
Zeehan town West Coast Pioneers Museum
Zeehan town West Coast Pioneers Museum
Zeehan town West Coast Pioneers Museum
Zeehan town West Coast Pioneers Museum
Approaching the west coast sand dunes
Approaching the west coast sand dunes
Approaching the west coast sand dunes
Approaching the west coast sand dunes
West coast sand dunes
West coast sand dunes
Pretty 'scotch broom' in blossom
Pretty 'scotch broom' in blossom
Home sweet home, through the garden gate
Home sweet home, through the garden gate
Strahan town along the Macquarie Harbor on the west coast
Strahan town along the Macquarie Harbor on the west coast
Strahan town along the Macquarie Harbor on the west coast
Strahan town along the Macquarie Harbor on the west coast
Strahan town along the Macquarie Harbor on the west coast
Strahan town along the Macquarie Harbor on the west coast
Tasmania's western wilderness
Tasmania's western wilderness
Empire Hotel in Queenstown
Empire Hotel in Queenstown
Woodwork inEmpire Hotel in Queenstown
Woodwork inEmpire Hotel in Queenstown
Old and new in Queenstown
Old and new in Queenstown
Old theatre with painted mural in Queenstown
Old theatre with painted mural in Queenstown
Main street in in Queenstown on Sunday morning
Main street in in Queenstown on Sunday morning
New library in in Queenstown
New library in in Queenstown
Scrapbook club in downtown in Queenstown on Saturday night
Scrapbook club in downtown in Queenstown on Saturday night
Scrapbook club in downtown in Queenstown on Saturday night
Scrapbook club in downtown in Queenstown on Saturday night
Scrapbook club in downtown in Queenstown on Saturday night
Scrapbook club in downtown in Queenstown on Saturday night
Mining monument in Queenstown. In the 1900s alluvial gold was
Mining monument in Queenstown. In the 1900s alluvial gold was discovered but mostly the area was mined for copper. Queenstown was the center of the Mount Lyell mining district and had numerous smelting works, brick-works, and sawmills. The town in its heyday had a collection of hotels, churches and schools that have all significantly reduced since the demise of the Mount Lyell company.
West coast mining sign
West coast mining sign
Copper ore at the mining monument
Copper ore at the mining monument
Hydraulic driller at mining monument
Hydraulic driller at mining monument
Drawings of mining operations
Drawings of mining operations
Old mine shaft
Old mine shaft
Vietnam War memorial in Queenstown
Vietnam War memorial in Queenstown
Forested hills were stripped of trees for fuel  for the
Forested hills were stripped of trees for fuel for the smelters over the course of a hundred years.
Forested hills were stripped of trees for fuel  for the
Forested hills were stripped of trees for fuel for the smelters over the course of a hundred years.
Forested hills were stripped of trees for fuel  for the
Forested hills were stripped of trees for fuel for the smelters over the course of a hundred years.
Forested hills were stripped of trees for fuel  for the
Forested hills were stripped of trees for fuel for the smelters over the course of a hundred years.
Forested hills were stripped of trees for fuel  for the
Forested hills were stripped of trees for fuel for the smelters over the course of a hundred years.
Regrowth
Regrowth
Regrowth
Regrowth
Eucalyptus forest
Eucalyptus forest
Blossoming
Blossoming
Blossoming
Blossoming
Warning sign for Short-beaked Echidna. The Short-beaked Echidna also known as
Warning sign for Short-beaked Echidna. The Short-beaked Echidna also known as the Spiny Anteater because of its diet of ants and termites, is one of four living species of echidna and the only member of the genus Tachyglossus. The Short-beaked Echidna is covered in fur and spines and has a distinctive snout and a specialized tongue, which it uses to catch its prey at a great speed. Like the other extant monotremes, the Short-beaked Echidna lays eggs; the monotremes are the only group of mammals to do so.
Warning sign for Short-beaked Echidna. The Short-beaked Echidna also known as
Warning sign for Short-beaked Echidna. The Short-beaked Echidna also known as the Spiny Anteater because of its diet of ants and termites, is one of four living species of echidna and the only member of the genus Tachyglossus. The Short-beaked Echidna is covered in fur and spines and has a distinctive snout and a specialized tongue, which it uses to catch its prey at a great speed. Like the other extant monotremes, the Short-beaked Echidna lays eggs; the monotremes are the only group of mammals to do so.
Warning sign for Wombats. Wombats are Australian marsupials; they are short-legged,
Warning sign for Wombats. Wombats are Australian marsupials; they are short-legged, muscular quadrupeds, approximately 1 metre (39 in) in length with a very short tail. They are found in forested, mountainous, and heathland areas of south-eastern Australia and Tasmania. The name wombat comes from the Eora Aboriginal community who were the original inhabitants of the Sydney area.
Lake St Clair Park
Lake St Clair Park
Lake St Clair Park
Lake St Clair Park
Lake St Clair Park
Lake St Clair Park
Entrance to Wall in the Wilderness (http://www.thewalltasmania.com/)  at Derwent Bridge. A
Entrance to Wall in the Wilderness (http://www.thewalltasmania.com/) at Derwent Bridge. A huge wood-carved work in progress,
Wall in the Wilderness (http://www.thewalltasmania.com/) at Derwent Bridge. A work in
Wall in the Wilderness (http://www.thewalltasmania.com/) at Derwent Bridge. A work in progress, The Wall is being carved from three-metre high wooden panels. The carved panels will tell the history of the harsh Central Highlands region - beginning with the indigenous people, then to the pioneering timber harvesters, pastoralists, miners and Hydro workers. When completed The Wall will be 100 metres long.
Metal eagle at entry to the Wall in the Wilderness
Metal eagle at entry to the Wall in the Wilderness (http://www.thewalltasmania.com/) at Derwent Bridge.
Wall in the Wilderness (http://www.thewalltasmania.com/) at Derwent Bridge. A work in
Wall in the Wilderness (http://www.thewalltasmania.com/) at Derwent Bridge. A work in progress, The Wall is being carved from three-metre high wooden panels. When completed The Wall will be 100 metres long by Greg Duncan.
Wall in the Wilderness (http://www.thewalltasmania.com/) at Derwent Bridge.  The carved
Wall in the Wilderness (http://www.thewalltasmania.com/) at Derwent Bridge. The carved panels will tell the history of the harsh Central Highlands region - beginning with the indigenous people, then to the pioneering timber harvesters, pastoralists, miners and Hydro workers. When completed The Wall will be 100 metres long.
Wall in the Wilderness (http://www.thewalltasmania.com/) at Derwent Bridge. A work in
Wall in the Wilderness (http://www.thewalltasmania.com/) at Derwent Bridge. A work in progress, The Wall is being carved from three-metre high wooden panels. The carved panels will tell the history of the harsh Central Highlands region - beginning with the indigenous people, then to the pioneering timber harvesters, pastoralists, miners and Hydro workers. When completed The Wall will be 100 metres long. Greg Duncan????????s sculpture The Wall will rank as a major work of art and tourist attraction in Tasmania