South America

 

Page 1 of 212»

Related GlobalGayz Articles & Photos:

Gay Life in Guyana (South America)

| February 3rd, 2016 | Comments Off on Gay Life in Guyana (South America)

  Intro:  a summary story about a small unusual country in South America that is culturally and historically not part of the continent. It is considered to be a Caribbean country yet is geographically part of the mainland of South America. It is mostly jungle with a thin veneer of development along the Atlantic coast. Unfortunately it has never been able to shake off its history of British occupation from the 18th to 20th centuries, including the language and the  pernicious laws that criminalize homosexuality. It is a culture with strong  religious attitudes that influence  the government when it considers decriminalizing gay life. It is in several important ways a country stuck in the past—except for the progressive efforts of the remarkable LGBT organizations SASOD and Guybow. I have not yet visited Guyana so the following story is taken from sources listed at the end as well as an online

See the Full Version Here

Guyana Resists Efforts to Repeal Anti-LGBTI Laws

| December 22nd, 2015 | Comments Off on Guyana Resists Efforts to Repeal Anti-LGBTI Laws

  Despite efforts by the UN and western countries urging Guyana to discard colonial-era British laws that criminalize homosexual behavior, the country has resisted modernizing its laws to align with more than 125 countries that do not have such laws. Although there has been free and unfettered freedom of expression (including tiny gay pride rallies), as of December 2015 no laws have changed.   Why? The low population base and weak secular educational system, along with Christian-Hindu presence (that includes prejudice against homosexuality) influence the substantial Amerindian population (Indo-Guyanese–East Indian–and Afro-Guyanese–African–cultures). Although anti-discrimination legislation was passed by the Guyanese National Assembly, it was not passed into law by the previous Presidents because of fervent lobbying by the religious communities–despite expressing hypocritical “love” for individuals engaged in same sex relationships. As a result, legislators are cowed into maintaining the irrational stigma that homosexuality carries, claiming that it’s  an offense to religion,

See the Full Version Here

Gay Life in French Guiana/Guyane (South America)–Fragments

| December 9th, 2015 | Comments Off on Gay Life in French Guiana/Guyane (South America)–Fragments

  French Guiana, officially called simply Guiana, is an overseas department and region of France, on the north Atlantic coast of South America. It borders Brazil to the east and south, and Suriname to the west. Its 83,534 km² area has a very low population density of only 3 inhabitants per km².  The total population is only 250,109 . As a territory of France the same  laws and rights apply, including gay marriage. But a visitor will find no visible sign of modern gay life in the country thanks to the predominant Roman Catholic faith. Historically, as a penal colony, there are reports of ‘rampant’ homosexuality in the prisons there. Posted here is a descriptive non-gay story about Guiana—not to be confused with the separate nearby country of Guyana, a former British colony. My research has turned up virtually nothing about LGBT life in Guiana today.  In the 20th century

See the Full Version Here

Gay Peru: Different Definitions of Gay

| January 1st, 2015 | Comments Off on Gay Peru: Different Definitions of Gay

Intro: From the Pacific to the Andes, Peruvian culture spans many civilizations across beautifully rugged terrain. It also contains different  views of homosexuality. In Peru, sexual labels vary with an individual’s behavior and self-definition. Meanwhile the gay ‘scene’ in Lima has become quietly lively.     Also see: Gay Peru News & Reports 2000 to present Gay Peru Photo Galleries By Richard Ammon Updated January 2015 A New Age and a New Scene Attitudes towards gays in Peru have changed for the better over the past ten years. Part of the force behind this social evolution are the worldwide emergence, publicity and activity of international pro-gay advocates led by high ranking people as the United Nations Secretary Ban Ki-moon as well as US President Obama and other heads of state in Europe. Also influential are major sports figures coming out, as well as gay and lesbian federal judges, country ambassadors,

See the Full Version Here

Gay Life in Ecuador

| September 6th, 2012 | Comments Off on Gay Life in Ecuador

Ecuador has undergone a remarkable transformation in the last few years. On 10th August 1998 the constitution of Ecuador was reformed to “recognise the equality of all before the law without discrimination against age, sex, ethnic orgin, colour, religion, political affiliation, economic position, sexual orientation, state of health, incapacity, or difference of any kind. But homosexuality continues to be viewed negatively so keep a low profile in public.   Most people who travel to Ecuador come to experience the variety of landscapes, climates, cultures, fauna and flora that this small country has to offer. Many tourists visiting Ecuador go to the amazing Galapagos Islands. However the rest of Ecuador has a great deal to offer. About the size of the state of Colorado, Ecuador has the highest population density of any South American country and also has a high proportion of indigenous people with their unique cultures and languages. Added

See the Full Version Here

Brazil – Rio City Centro 2 (photos)

| July 15th, 2011 | Comments Off on Brazil – Rio City Centro 2
Rio City Centro, Rio de Janiero, Brazil

Downtown Centro Rio is inland from the beaches. It is the heart of the city where financial, legislative and political offices are located. These include Brazil’s first state-supported LGBT agencies that were set up to counter homophobia in the city–‘Rio Sem Homophobia’. Their offices take up a whole floor of City Hall. Centro also includes parks, markets, colonial architecture, modern skyscrapers, the unusual Metropolitan Catholic Cathedral and the first electric trolley car in the country…and much more.

See the Full Version Here

Brazil – Rio City – Centro and Santa Terese Areas (photos)

| July 15th, 2011 | Comments Off on Brazil – Rio City – Centro and Santa Terese Areas
Centro region, Rio de Janeiro Brazil

Santa Teresa is the name of an uphill neighborhood above Rio Centro on Santa Teresa hill. It’s famous for its winding, narrow streets along which ‘upscale slums’ are mixed with middle-class houses and artist studios. Among the buildings are some elegant mansions left over from the more opulent 19th century. In 1896, the Carioca Aqueduct, a colonial structure that used to bring water to the center of Rio, was converted into a viaduct for the Santa Teresa Trolley (bondinho). The historic tram line is still in operation today carrying passengers–students, workers, tourists. The track starts in the city center then crosses the old arched aqueduct and snakes through the picturesque streets with its wheels screeching at every curve.

See the Full Version Here

Brazil: Rio de Janeiro Rocinha Slum (photos)

| July 13th, 2011 | Comments Off on Brazil: Rio de Janeiro Rocinha Slum
Rocinha Slum of Rio de Janiero Brazil

Rocinha is the largest slum (favela) area in Rio. It’s situated on the hills behind the city with panoramic views of the mountains and ocean. The people are generally poor but life in the favela teems with energy, enterprise, domestic activity, artwork, music (we encountered a spontaneous dance performance by a 9 year-old), day care centers, charity groups, schools as well as mafia-style control zones where the drug trade is said to flourish. Small tourist groups are led through the narrow alleyways by an authorized guide, occasionally passing by a gang member armed with a semi-automatic rifle. Other favelas can be navigated independently by tourist on foot. Going alone was considered previously consider foolish, but some are now under control by the Police Pacification Units and are safe to visit, such as the Santa Marta or Cantagalo favelas. People are friendly, some with shops selling pastries or jewelry.

See the Full Version Here

Brazil – Rio – Trip to Christo Redentor Mountain (photos)

| July 13th, 2011 | Comments Off on Brazil – Rio – Trip to Christo Redentor Mountain
Christ the Redeemer statue, Rio de Janiero, Brazil

Christ the Redeemer is a statue of Jesus Christ on Corcovado mountain in the Tijuca Forest National Park overlooking the city. It is 39.6 metres (130 ft) tall and 30 metres (98 ft) wide. The statue has become an icon of Rio and Brazil. It is made of reinforced concrete and soapstone, and was constructed between 1922 and 1931. Read more on Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christ_the_Redeemer_%28statue%29)

See the Full Version Here

Brazil: Rio – Copacabana and Ipanema Beach Areas (photos)

| July 13th, 2011 | Comments Off on Brazil: Rio – Copacabana and Ipanema Beach Areas
Copacabana and Ipanema Beach Areas

Ipanema Beach and Copacabana Beach are a paradise for people watching, sunbathing and socializing. On weekends the avenues along the beaches are closed to traffic and they become great long promenades of people dressed in every manner of attire–including uninhibited men and women dressed in tiny swimsuits. The atmosphere is mellow, respectful, playful and friendly with virtually no sign of the crime so often reported by the media. The beaches are miles long and accommodate tens of thousands of people; the crowds vary according to the weather.

See the Full Version Here

Brazil – Sao Paulo City Scenes (photos)

| June 22nd, 2011 | Comments Off on Brazil – Sao Paulo City Scenes
Brazil Sao Paulo

With over 20 million people in the metropolitan area, São Paulo is the largest city in Brazil, the largest city in the western and southern hemisphere, and the world’s seventh largest city by population.

See the Full Version Here

Brazil – Sao Paulo – Paulista/Caneca Area (photos)

| June 21st, 2011 | Comments Off on Brazil – Sao Paulo – Paulista/Caneca Area
Photo from Sao Paulo Brazil

Sao Paulo has significant influence nationally and internationally, in terms of culture, economy and politics. It houses several important monuments, parks and museums. It is also home to the world’s largest gay Pride Parade that happens every June (separately from Carnival in February). The last parade, held on June 6, 2010, attracted about 3 million people. The Paulista-Caneca area is populated by many LGBT citizens with numerous bars, shops and cafes, Pictured here (first 5 photos) is Casarao-Brasil, one of many LGBT organizations in the city. The central city is generally accepting of same-sex couples who feel comfortable enough to hold hands in public (photo 6).

See the Full Version Here

Gay Brazil 2011

| May 17th, 2011 | Comments Off on Gay Brazil 2011
Gay Brazil Beach

A Huge Country with a Huge Gay Scene By Richard Ammon GlobalGayz.com May 2011 For the second time in as many months I happened to be in a country when historic LGBT events have occurred. First, in Botswana in March of this year when the human rights organization, Bonela, and the LGBT association LeGaBiBo, for the first time ever, filed a High Court suit against the government claiming the country’s anti-gay laws currently on the books are unconstitutional. The second happened May 5, 2011 in Brazil when the Federal Supreme Court ruled unanimously (10 to 0) that Civil Unions are legally acceptable relationships between adult citizens of the same gender. The ruling grants that gay couples are entitled to most of the rights of heterosexual partners, including marital ceremonies, pension benefits, inheritance and, according to some lawyers, the right to adopt children. (photo, Iguacu Falls Brazil side) “This is a

See the Full Version Here

Gay Brazil 2011–An Enormous Community

| April 29th, 2011 | Comments Off on Gay Brazil 2011–An Enormous Community

Brazil is a dazzle. Every aspect of this huge country overwhelms, challenges, stimulates or puzzles the first time visitor, which I am. I came for three full weeks and each day has been a unique chapter in my memory book–even just driving a car on the main highways here. Brazil decided decades ago, unfortunately, to invest in roads instead of railways, thanks to the lobbying influence of the oil, rubber and auto industries. The result is that today tens of thousands of heavy cargo trucks–6 to 24 wheelers–blaze along the highways making pleasure driving anything but. But that’s another whole story. (photo above: Iguacu Falls) My story is about LGBT life in Brazil which is also a lesson in overwhelm. There are hundreds of lesbian, gay, trans and bisexual organizations in this country, mostly in the major cities along the Atlantic coastline which stretches over 4000 miles south to north.

See the Full Version Here

Colombia Gays Continue to Win Rights

| January 11th, 2011 | Comments Off on Colombia Gays Continue to Win Rights

Intro: For the past three years, Colombia has made important and steady progress in recognizing LGBT individuals and couples. Three comments and an interview attest to this positive development. But caution is still advised for LGBT people as the country is a typical ‘macho’ Latino culture not inclined to favor homosexuality.   Story edited by Richard Ammon GlobalGayz.com January 2011 Also see: Gay Colombia News & Reports 2001 to Present Gay Colombia web sites: http://www.guiagaycolombia.com/ http://www.misscolombiagaymedellin.com/ Overview of LGBT Scene in Colombia April 17, 2008 Colombia has once again made news in its search for social justice on planet earth, with this decision of the constitutional court. The court considered that the same pension system presently in force is applicable to same-sex couples. With this decision, the court has continued down the road it started on last year, when it made man-woman couples that lived together the same as same-sex

See the Full Version Here

A Gay Man Shares His Experience

| December 31st, 2010 | Comments Off on A Gay Man Shares His Experience

  Intro: Homosexual men in Guyana are still finding it difficult to live free from discrimination and harassment in the capital of Guyana. Ignorance and bullying are common experiences for anyone perceived to be gay.   From: CaribWorldNews December 1, 2010 By Elan Era John, Panos Global AIDS Programme Georgetown, Guyana Homosexual men in Guyana are still finding it difficult to live free from fear of stigma and discrimination as the World celebrates another AIDS Day today. These are everyday parts of their lives whether at school, work or accessing services from hospitals or transportation service providers. Kobe, a young openly homosexual man, said his first experience with stigma and discrimination goes way back to his childhood when he was bullied and harassed. `Being in school, having persons tell you or trouble you and you would have to shift to doing certain things.` He explains some of the shifts he

See the Full Version Here

Getting Things Straight–Gay Rights in Uruguay

| December 31st, 2010 | Comments Off on Getting Things Straight–Gay Rights in Uruguay

Intro: Guest writer Jane McDevitt reviews the recent past and hopeful future for unmarried and LGBT couples in Uruguay under the new President Mujica. Uruguay was the first Latin American country to allow same-sex civil unions so human rights groups are eager to see what direction the new leader will take. His publicised liberal political ideology is awaiting actual proof.      From: Ola Uruguay By Jane McDevitt December 19, 2010 Uruguay has become a trailblazer for gay rights not only amongst other Latin American countries but also when viewed in an international context. President Mujica has yet to be tested on his stance on gay rights, however his predecessor President Tabare Vazquez was known for a progressive attitude to gay rights during his five year tenure. The then president produced a sweeping tide of legislative change, making Uruguay a desirable country in which to be openly gay. The current president’s

See the Full Version Here

Gay Life in Salvador, Brazil

| January 1st, 2010 | Comments Off on Gay Life in Salvador, Brazil

Intro: A guest author from Holland leaps across the Atlantic to far off Salvador city in Brazil where he finds sunshine, passion and willing companions to share languid days and steamy nights. He offers useful insights on realities of money, prostitution, LGBT venues, lesbians and pro-gay laws. Also see: Gay Brazil News & Reports 2000 to present Gay Brazil Stories By Vincent van der K (Story from: http://www.gay-news.com/article04.php?sid=475 For Dutch gays who’ve had it with once again Gran Canaria or Ibiza, a visit to the exciting Brazilian town Salvador might offer new and stimulating vistas. Salvador, capital of Bahia, in Northeast Brazil at the Atlantic coast. With its tropical sea climate, the mercury on the coldest day of the last 300 years indicated 21 C. In summer, December – February, temperatures can rise to some 35 C. But the seawinds bring in an ever welcome cooling breeze. For centuries Salvador

See the Full Version Here

Gay Brazil

| January 1st, 2009 | Comments Off on Gay Brazil

Homosexuality in Brazil: Two Stories (1) A long candid talk with author James N. Green who wrote Beyond Carnival,–"a story of how gays found a way to survive in a society laced with petty prejudices, stereotypes, and violence. In the midst of it all, they managed to create lives for themselves that were full of passion, pain, love, happiness, and a bit of drama." (2) This is followed by personal coments by a native gay Brazilian who says "The laws here are very fair towards gays… gays and straights live freely with each other." Also see: Gay Brazil News & Reports 2000 to present Gay Brazil Stories From: Brazzil, ( http://www.brazzil.com ) (http://www.brazzil.com/p106feb03.htm) Story by Bernadete R. Beserra (1) Last June, thousands of Cariocas poured onto the streets of Copacabana to celebrate the World Cup victory. They were joined by over a hundred thousand gays, lesbians, and travestis (transvestites), who

See the Full Version Here

Uraguay – Montevedeo City and Punte del Este (photos)

| January 1st, 2009 | Comments Off on Uraguay – Montevedeo City and Punte del Este

According to Transparency International, Uruguay is the second least corrupt country in Latin America (after Chile), with its political and labor conditions being among the freest on the continent. In November 2007 it became the first Latin American country and the second in all of the Americas (after Canada) to recognize same-sex civil unions at the national level. Montevedeo city is a variety of delights and decay with old European archtecture and new life styles. It was founded by the Spanish in the early 18th century as a military stronghold. Uruguay won its independence in 1825-1828 following a three-way struggle between Spain, Argentina and Brazil. It is a constitutional democracy, where the president fulfills the roles of both head of state and head of government. In the south is Punte del Este, a beautiful beach city. Read the story about Gay Uruguay

See the Full Version Here

Gay Varieties in Bolivia

| January 1st, 2009 | Comments Off on Gay Varieties in Bolivia

Intro: Catholic Bolivia is a difficult country in which to express lesbigay truth. Newly met friends there described to me their hidden lives and feelings in the face of strong religious prejudice, political disdain, family honor and macho military opposition. Following the first story about Daniel is a second short correspondence with a gay American living in Bolivia for a year; he describes his experience of trying to integrate with local gays in La Paz. Also see: Gay Bolivia News & Reports 2002 to present Gay Bolivia Photo Gallery by Richard Ammon Updated August 2012   Daniel and the New Night Life Walking anonymously among the masses of Sunday-best churchgoers in downtown La Paz, Daniel is making his way in the opposite direction toward home. Sleep, not prayer, is uppermost on his mind as he heads toward the sparse but tidy apartment he shares with his sister and mother half

See the Full Version Here

Gay Life in Paraguay

| January 1st, 2009 | Comments Off on Gay Life in Paraguay

A native Paraguayan offers a brief overview of Paraguay and the modest lesbigay life there. This is preceded by a first person commentary of a gay Peace Corps volunteer about finding a community there. Also See: Gay Paraguay News & Reports 1986 to present (1) Building My Own Closet in Paraguay http://lgbrpcv.org/2012/01/28/building-my-own-closet-in-paraguay/ January 28, 2012 From a Current Peace Corps Volunteer I am very lucky. Until now, I have never lived in a community where I have felt uncomfortable being out. Paraguay is different. I have all the support and respect I could ask for in the Peace Corps office, and from fellow volunteers. But, self-imposed closeting in my own community is taking a toll. Part of it is my inability to read the subtle cultural signs, which as a foreigner I frequently miss. I worry about small comments from people in my community. I second guess conversations, searching for

See the Full Version Here

Salt of the Earth: the Great Lake of Uyuni, Bolivia

| January 1st, 2009 | Comments Off on Salt of the Earth: the Great Lake of Uyuni, Bolivia

Intro: In the middle of Bolivia there is one of the world’s great salt plains, which becomes a salt lake in the wet season. In the middle of the lake is a unique hotel with 360-degree views. Along the edge of the lake is a small town that makes a living from mining salt. Also see: Gay Bolivia News & Reports 2002 to present Gay Bolivia Photo Gallery By Richard Ammon April 1999 Rev February 2001 (1320 words)   Between heaven and earth there is a great watery salt plain where the heavens are mirrored in the horizon of the earth. It is a remarkable illusion, with no distinction between clouds and terra firma. Blue layers of Altiplano sky on white layers of clouds spread out like a mother reflected in a child’s eye. The vision is a surreal scape of melded water, clouds and cerulean heaven with no distinctions.

See the Full Version Here

Into the Bowels and History of the Potosi Silver Mine

| January 1st, 2009 | Comments Off on Into the Bowels and History of the Potosi Silver Mine

Intro: High in the mountains of Bolivia is the town of Potosi, home to a famous silver mine with an austere history. A visit there is a journey into a harrowing way of life and a grueling history of greed and conquest. Also See: Gay Bolivia News & Reports 2002 to present Gay Bolivia Photo Gallery By Richard Ammon Spring 1999 Silver and Death There is a dusty treeless hill in Bolivia south of the equator called Cerro Rico (rich hill), a lifeless hump of land five thousand miles from Spain. In 1544 a peasant happened upon some shiny ore on the side of the hill and showed it to his friends who agreed it was silver. Delighted but not surprised, the first claim was quietly dug by those few men in this remote desert town oblivious to the strong-armed grasp of the encroaching and voracious European conquistadors. But the

See the Full Version Here

Peru – Cuzco and Machu Picchu (photos)

| January 1st, 2009 | Comments Off on Peru – Cuzco and Machu Picchu

The usual tourist route through Lima, Cuzco and Machu Picchu–beautiful and sublime. Peruvian territory was home to the ancient Norte Chico civilization, one of the oldest in the world, and to the Inca Empire, the largest state in Pre-Columbian America. The Spanish Empire conquered the region in the 16th century and established a Viceroyalty, which included most of its South American colonies. After achieving independence in 1821, Peru has undergone periods of political unrest and fiscal crisis as well as periods of stability and economic upswing. Read the story about Gay Peru

See the Full Version Here
Page 1 of 212»